Boston Terrier – Page 2 – Dog Breed Review

Boston Terrier

History

The best and most accountable version of this breed’s history goes back to 1870. The story involves a dog named, Judge, and two friends from the Boston area. According to accounts, a Bostonian named, Robert C. Hooper, had obtained a dog from a friend and fellow breeder, Edward Burnett. Although other accounts vary, one consistent detail of the Boston Terrier’s history is the dog named, Judge.

Judge’s ancestry line is either original Bull and Terrier breeds or even a direct result of today’s, English Bulldog.

According to the American Kennel Club, who originally registered and recognized the Boston Terrier in 1893, that dog Judge is the ancestor of today’s Boston Terriers.

By then, fanciers in Boston had already created their own American Bull Terrier Club, but the 30 members disagreed on the club’s name. In the midst of that disagreement sparked names such as Round Heads, Bull Terriers and Boston Bulls. Eventually, these men settled with Boston Terrier Club.

The breed became the first non sporting group dog in the U.S. and the first to be inducted into the American Kennel Club out of all ten American made breeds.

Most Boston Terriers during this time were bigger in stature and used for devious activities such as chasing down rats in factories and fighting in pits with fellow canines. However, once the breed gained clearance from the AKC, they were bred down to size for non sporting group purposes. Their coat color and other markings weren’t written into their standard until the 1900’s. Today, a Boston Terrier can belong to three different weight groups.

In 1915, the Boston Terrier was considered to be the most popular dog breed in the U.S. The American Gentleman received a distinguishing honor being named as America’s bicentennial dog back in 1976. In 1979-80, the breed was officially Massachusetts state dog and has been featured as Boston University’s mascot.

Today, the Boston Terrier is still very popular with dog lovers and is considered the 21st most popular breed in the world, according to the American Kennel Club.